Rules that make it easy for NRIs to buy property in India

 

It makes sense for non-resident Indians (NRIs) and persons of Indian origin (PIOs) to invest in property in India. A NRI is a person who is not resident in India.

According to the Foreign Exchange Management Act (FEMA), ‘person resident in India’ includes a person residing in India for more than 182 days during the course of the preceding financial year. It does not include a person who has gone out of India on employment, business or vocation, or for any other purpose for an uncertain period.

Also, a person who has come to stay in India other than on employment, business or vocation, or for any other purpose for an uncertain period. All other persons are NRIs. NRIs are permitted to buy and sell property in India. The acquisition and transfer of property by NRIs should be in accordance with the FEMA.

The property should be purchased through a registered conveyance deed. It may also be purchased on a power of attorney. In the latter case, an agreement to sell and a power of attorney are executed by the seller in favour of the buyer.

RBI permission not needed

NRIs do not require permission of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to acquire residential or commercial property in India.

The RBI has granted general permission to foreign citizens of Indian origin, whether resident in India or abroad, to purchase property in India for their bona fide residential purposes.

The payment has to be made either out of inward remittances in foreign exchange through normal banking channels or out of funds in a NRE or FCNR account maintained with a bank in India

 

 

Declaration mandatory

Foreign citizens of Indian origin, purchasing residential property in India under the general permission are required to file a declaration with the central office of the RBI at Mumbai within 90 days from the date of purchase of the property or final payment of amount.

This has to include a certified copy of the document evidencing the transaction and bank certificate regarding the amount paid.

Sale possible: The RBI has granted general permission for sale of such property without its permission. However, where the property is purchased by another foreign citizen of Indian origin, the funds towards the purchase should either be remitted to India or paid out of the balance in a NRE or FCNR account.

The remittance of the sale proceeds depends on the mode of acquisition – whether it was acquired out of funds remitted from outside or out of rupee funds. A property can be acquired out of rupee funds by a NRI before leaving India, or after leaving India, but from a savings bank account in an Indian bank out of income earned in India.

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Repatriation

The proceeds can be repatriated provided the amount does not exceed the amount paid to acquire the property in foreign exchange received from overseas, the amount paid from a FCNR account, or the foreign currency equivalent of the amount paid from funds held in a NRE account.

On residential properties purchased, the RBI considers applications for repatriation of sale proceeds up to the consideration amount remitted in foreign exchange for the acquisition of two properties. The balance amount of sale proceeds, if any, will have to be credited to an ordinary non-resident rupee account of the owner of the property.

Applications for the repatriation of sale proceeds are considered provided the sale takes place after three years from the date of final purchase deed or from the date of payment of final instalment of consideration amount, whichever is later.

 

 

 

Gifting Property

The RBI has also granted permission to foreign citizens of Indian origin to acquire or dispose of properties – up to two houses – by way of gift from or to a relative who may be an Indian citizen or a person of Indian origin whether resident in India or not, subject to compliance with applicable tax laws.

Also, it permits non-resident persons (foreign citizens) of Indian origin to transfer by way of gift property held by them in India to relatives and charitable organisations subject to the condition that the provisions of all other laws, including the Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act, are complied with.

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Finance

The RBI has granted general permission to certain financial institutions providing housing finance to grant housing loans to non-resident Indian nationals for acquisition of a house for self-occupation subject to certain conditions.

The purpose of the loan, margin money and the quantum of loan will be on par with those applicable to housing loans to residents. Repayment of loan should be made within a period not exceeding 15 years out of inward remittances or out of funds held in the investors’ NRE, FCNR or NRO account.

The loan amount cannot be credited to a NRE or FCNR account of a NRI or PIO. The loan amount has to be fully secured by equitable mortgage of the property proposed to be acquired. If required, the bank may also have a lien on the NRI’s or PIO’s other assets in India.

Further, the instalments of the loan, interest and other charges should be paid by the NRI or PIO through remittances from outside India through normal banking channels, or out of funds in a NRE, FCNR, or NRO account in India. The RBI has granted general permission to let out a property in India. The rental income or proceeds of such investments are eligible for repatriation too. The loan and interest can also be repaid out of rental income of the property.

 

A good deal

Where property is purchased by a foreign citizen of Indian origin, the funds towards the purchase should be remitted to India or paid out of the balance in a NRE or FCNR account.

Applications for the repatriation of sale proceeds are considered if the sale takes place after three years from the date of final purchase deed or from the date of payment of final instalment of consideration amount, whichever is later.

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Five Things NRIs Buying Property In India Must Know

If you are a non-resident Indian (NRI) planning to buy a property in India, time could not have been better for you to do so. While India’s real estate sector has seen a price correction in the recent past, buying property in Indian has also become more lucrative with favourable currency rates.what differentiates NRI property buying from resident property purchases in India:

  • An NRI buying an immovable property in Indiadoes not require any special permission. However, the payment can’t be made in foreign currency. NRIs can make the purchase using Indian currency, the Rupee, through funds received in the country by means of normal banking channels. These funds have to be maintained in a non-resident account under the foreign Exchange management Act (FEMA) and the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) regulations. There are also no restrictions on the number of immovable properties that an NRI may purchase, either residential or commercial.
  • NRI investments into the property market are treated on par with investment made by resident Indians, but for some exceptions:

Nature of property

NRIs can buy all sorts of immovable properties in India other than agricultural land, farm house and plantation property. To acquire agricultural land/plantation property/farm house in India, they have to get approval from the RBI and the government.

Taxation

When an NRI sells a property in India, TDS (tax deducted at source) calculation is done at the rate of 20.6 per cent on long-term capital gains and 30.9 per cent on short-term capital gains. However, the final taxation rate is similar for NRIs and resident Indians. If an NRI has a lower tax slab applicable to him, he can apply for a refund of the TDS by filing their income tax return.

Home loan

The RBI has given a general permission to banks and housing finance companies registered with the National Housing Bank to provide loans to NRIs for buying residential property in India. Sanctioned in Indian currency, the loan has to be repaid using the same currency. However, the loan amount, according to the regulations, cannot be credited directly to the bank account of an NRI and has to be disbursed to either the seller’s or the developer’s account. The loan can be repaid using funds in an NRI’s NRO/NRE account or FCNR deposits.

Power of attorney (PoA)

As they live outside, NRIs have an option to give PoA to their friends or relatives to complete the property purchase process in India. The PoA can be general or specific about the rights your representative can exercise.

Repatriation of funds back to the foreign country

There are certain guidelines for repatriation of funds. An NRI or Person of Indian origin (PIO) may repatriate the proceeds from the sale of immovable property in India on the conditions mentioned below:

  • The property must have been purchased in accordance with the FEMA directives, applicable at the time of purchase.
  • The amount repatriated cannot exceed the original amount paid for the property, if the property was acquired in foreign exchange remitted through normal banking channels or out of funds held in an FCNR (B) account.

However, in the following circumstances, the NRI/PIO may repatriate a maximum of $ 1 million per financial year:

  • Out of the balance held in the NRO account, if the propertywas purchased out of rupee source of funds.
  • If the property was acquired by way of gift, sale proceeds must be credited to an NRO account and may be repatriated thereafter.
  • If the property was inherited from a resident Indian, funds may be repatriated on producing a documentary evidence proving inheritance, an undertaking by the NRI/PIO, and a certificate of an authorised chartered accountant in the formats prescribed by the Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT).
  • In the case of a residential property, repatriation of sale proceeds is restricted to less than or equal to two properties.
  • A foreign national may repatriate sale proceeds even if the property was inherited from a person outside India. However, prior approval of the RBI must be obtained.
  • A citizen of Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, China, Afghanistan and Iran must seek specific approval from the RBI for repatriation of sale proceeds.

Apart from the above-mentioned points, an NRI is given the same treatment as applicable to any other Indian resident.

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